Are Low Job Claims an Omen for Faster Job Growth?

Last week in the capital markets was a “risk-off” week. We saw more signs that manufacturing is driving moderate economic growth. There was also some good news for the “residential investment” component of gross domestic product (GDP). It’s shaping up to be another year of the square root recovery…but still with core strength.

Claims Remain Low … An Omen of Faster Job Growth?

  • Initial jobless claims (293k) rose week over week (w/w) but stayed below the four-week average of 300k.
  • It’s remarkable how few employees are losing their jobs. In conjunction with the recent rise in the number of job openings, it suggests that maybe employers are finding themselves understaffed?

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As the Economy Improves, the Fed Recalibrates its Message

As the economy and labor market improve, quantitative easing (QE) is wound down and the first rate hike draws nearer, the language of the Fed evolves accordingly.  Both the minutes of the June FOMC meeting and the remarks of Fed Chair Janet Yellen at Jackson Hole were incrementally less dovish than earlier language.  The pace of these changes suggests that the Fed is comfortable “the ball is in the fairway”…the likelihood of a surprise policy shift is low. Continue reading

UK Forecast Update: Growth, Inflation and Monetary Policy

Pioneer’s Head of Global Asset Allocation Research, Monica Defend, along with Europe and EMEA Global Asset Allocation Research Senior Economist, Andrea Brasili, recently released an update on the UK economy. The update was based on the 2Q14 preliminary results for gross domestic product (GDP), which came in higher than expected. They expect growth above 3%, higher inflation in 2015, and a gradual shift in monetary policy towards higher rates. Highlights from their report are below. To read the full report, click here. Continue reading

What Happened within the Espirito Santo Group?

Observations on the Capital Markets – Week Ended July 11, 2014

It was a tough week for Europe over all last week – industrial production declined in Germany, Italy, France, and the UK, with the details broadly downbeat. Trade (import and export) data, especially from Germany, was disappointing as well. But the big story in Europe last week came from Portugal, where Banco Espírito Santo (BES), a leading Portuguese bank, suffered a share price crash and trading was suspended after reports of financial irregularities.

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Last Week’s Jobs Report Not as Bad as it Sounded, Same for Capital Markets

Observations on the Capital Markets – Week Ended February 7, 2014

The jobs reports were better underneath than on the surface

The data: Initial unemployment claims for the month were 331K. The “establishment survey” showed headline employment growth of 113k, below consensus expectations of 189k. The details were less disappointing, however.Prior months were revised up by 34k. Wages continued to rise slowly. The household survey — the basis for calculating the unemployment rate — showed employment rising by 616k. But because the labor participation rate rose 0.2 to 63.0%, the estimated workforce rose by 499k and the unemployment rate fell only to 6.6%.

The upshot: The number of persons employed part time for economic reasons (sometimes referred to as involuntary part-time workers) fell by 514k (so, by implication, the number of full-time workers rose by 1.1 million!). Finally, we got the periodic revisions to the past year’s data, the net effect of which was to revise 2013 job growth up from 2.19mm to 2.32mm.

Comment: There’s often a pretty big divergence between the “household” and “establishment” surveys. It’s not unusual to have discrepancies . . . they tend to vary month-to-month but converge over time. Continue reading

The U.S. Begins an (Un)employment Experiment

Observations on the Capital Markets – Week Ended January 3, 2014

Extended unemployment benefits stopped for 1.3 million people at year-end. This doesn’t change their employment status . . . they just stop getting unemployment compensation. Extended benefits (of up to 99 weeks) was part of the recession-fighting fiscal stimulus package. A question was: did this create a dis-incentive to find a job (aka “funemployment”). Continue reading

The Fed is Playing Hamlet to the Markets

To taper or not to taper—that is the question the Fed is asking itself. What’s moving the market is (it appears) the odds of Fed action. For the first half of last week, “good news was bad news” as stock and bond markets apparently interpreted better economic data as suggesting an earlier QE (Quantitative Easing) Taper. On Friday, the market apparently decided the jobs report was good enough to further reduce downside risks to the economy but not strong enough to spur the Fed to action. Continue reading

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