Signs Point to Continued Slow Growth Ahead

Last week’s data provided a mixed picture of the economy. Businesses produced more, but demand growth was soft. That combination suggests slower future economic growth, not acceleration (but still growth, not recession). Some points to note:

  • The NFIB Small Business Optimism Index ticked up from 95.0 to 95.7.
  • The Empire State (NY Fed) Index slipped, but remains strong at 14.7.
  • Industrial production rose, led by auto production, and capacity utilization ticked up slightly as well.
  • Business inventories rose modestly…slightly faster than sales.
  • Consumer confidence slipped, despite good job market data…too many war/conflict/disease stories in the paper? That said, retail sales managed a 0.2% increase month over month (m/m) – still below expectations.
  • Mortgage applications ticked down week over week (w/w); the generic rate dropped to 4.24%.
  • Inflation remains comfortably below trigger levels for Fed tightening

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UK Forecast Update: Growth, Inflation and Monetary Policy

Pioneer’s Head of Global Asset Allocation Research, Monica Defend, along with Europe and EMEA Global Asset Allocation Research Senior Economist, Andrea Brasili, recently released an update on the UK economy. The update was based on the 2Q14 preliminary results for gross domestic product (GDP), which came in higher than expected. They expect growth above 3%, higher inflation in 2015, and a gradual shift in monetary policy towards higher rates. Highlights from their report are below. To read the full report, click here. Continue reading

Geopolitics Trumped Economics in Last Week’s Capital Markets

Observations on the Capital Markets – Week Ended August 8, 2014

Ukraine developments, more than economic news, seemed to drive the day-to-day pattern of market returns.  Russia first massed troops on the border, prompting NATO to warn of imminent invasion risks, then sent them back to their barracks, keying Friday’s rally.  The conflict is far from over.

Developments in Gaza (a brief cease-fire) and Iraq—where Obama (reluctantly, it seems) authorized airstrikes against ISIS, leaving both domestic hawks and doves feeling unsatisfied—also made the front page, while central banks in Europe, England, Japan, Australia, and India all left policy essentially unchanged—not front page news.  The global composite Purchasing Managers Index (PMI) made a new 9-year high in July at 55.5 ‑ but with war risks high, no one paid much attention.         Continue reading

The FOMC Holds Steady as Markets Hit a “Tipping Point”

 

Observations on the Capital Markets – Week Ended August 1, 2014

The FOMC met last week, expressed satisfaction and maintained course. While their policy decisions (continue the taper—now $25b—and keep the Fed Funds rate where it is) were no surprise, the language of the Fed statement was tweaked to reflect the continued/continuing improvement in the economy and labor markets (e.g.: “the likelihood of inflation running persistently below 2% has diminished somewhat”).  The Fed feels it is accomplishing its goal…so a continuation of policy normalization is appropriate.

At the same time, the Fed statement said “…a range of labor market indicators suggests that there remains significant underutilization of labor resources.” Analysis: the Yellen Fed is moving cautiously…with Japan and Europe still weak, the Fed appears willing to risk an inflationary boom in the U.S. to minimize the likelihood of having to fight a recession and/or deflation when it has a bloated balance sheet and low Fed Funds rate, but very robust tools to fight inflation.  As I said on CNBC last week, a submarine commander doesn’t give the order to submerge when most of the hatches are closed.

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Two Preconditions of Fed Tightening Evident in Last Week’s Data

The Yellen Fed is wary of tightening too soon. It wants to see significant improvement in labor markets. (We’re seeing it.) It also wants to see evidence that U.S. inflation has formed a bottom. This precondition for a tighter Fed policy is also being fulfilled – CPI inflation has been steady and slow…but not slowing.

U.S. Economic Activity Looks Good

  • Initial unemployment claims dropped to 284k, the first reading this cycle below 300k and the lowest since early 2006. These are boom-time readings, not recovering economy readings.
  • CPI came in at 2.1% y/y; Core was 1.9%.
  • About 200 S&P 500 companies have reported so far; more than 70% (slightly better than average) have beaten consensus.
  • The Chicago Fed National Activity Index, a gauge of economic activity, was slightly above-trend.
  • The Markit U.S. manufacturing PMI softened a bit, to 56.3…still strong (50 is break-even).
  • The Richmond Fed’s manufacturing index (zero is break-even) rose from 4 to 7–solid; hiring was notably strong.
  • The Kansas City Fed manufacturing index rose from 6 to 9, lifted by durable goods producers and employment. Rising quit rates particularly among machinists and welders were cited.

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“Whatever it Takes” Two Years Later: What’s New?

Today is the second anniversary of Mario Draghi’s “Whatever it takes” pronouncement during the darkest days for the euro. Let me share with you some thoughts on how that event probably changed the course of the Eurozone.

Draghi’s speech did what it was supposed to do – it preserved the euro and it calmed the economy and the financial markets – without costing a single euro. The most important measure of success is that after the speech, the Outright Monetary Transaction Program (OMT), which allowed the European Central Bank (ECB) to buy short-term bonds from euro governments, was not utilized even once. The bottom line: The speech and the program were nothing more than a communications initiative, albeit an extremely adept one.

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U.S. Forecast Update: Growth, Inflation and Central Bank Policy

Pioneer’s Head of Global Asset Allocation Research, Monica Defend, along with U.S. and Latin America Global Asset Allocation Research Economist, Annalisa Usardi, recently released an update on the U.S. economy. The update was based on the Bureau of Economic Analysis’ (BEA) release of the third and final estimates 1Q14 gross domestic product (GDP), which came in lower than expected. The forecast update focuses on three areas: growth, inflation and central bank policy. Below are some highlights from their report. To read the full report, click here. Continue reading

Labor Market Looking More “Healed” Than “Healing”

Observations on the Capital Markets – Week Ended July 18, 2014

Federal Reserve Chairwoman Janet Yellen’s Congressional testimony this week, in my view, was not pointing to bubbles. In her testimony, she suggested that valuations of social media and biotech stocks and lower-rated corporate debt appear “stretched.”  Some observers suggested she was saying we are in a bubble.  But I have a different perspective: I think she was saying, in effect, “yes, prices are high in some niches, but not generally.” In any case, it’s doubtful Yellen is shifting her focus from less-than-full-employment to the question of possible market bubbles. Continue reading

Puerto Rico Bonds Part II: Understanding the Volatility

Follow-up to February’s article Puerto Rico: A Delicate Balancing Act. 

In June of 2014 the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico’s legislature passed the Puerto Public Corporations Debt Enforcement and Recovery Act (the Act) for restructuring the outstanding debt of public corporations. Its passage got a cold reception from the municipal bond market. Continue reading

Bubbles Detector

Summer is time for vacation, and getting ready for a trip has become almost a ritual for me: pack bags for my large family, load the car, don’t forget the GPS and check weather conditions. The last two points, I believe, apply not only to planning a safe and comfortable personal trip, but also to navigating the financial markets.

The financial “weather” seems nice: volatility is extremely low across almost all asset classes, as a consequence of the extra-loose monetary policy. However, as with the weather, we are aware that financial conditions can rapidly change. History suggests that periods of exceptionally low volatility should be treated with skepticism, as they have usually preceded vicious market turmoil. Continue reading

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