Did Fears of the Fed Spark Bond Market Selloff?

Last week in the capital markets: Bonds sold off globally in the week before the Fed meeting.

It was a quiet week for economic news, and the geopolitical front was relatively quiet (less fighting but more sanctions in Europe, moving toward a bigger effort against ISIS) but fears that the Fed is behind the curve seemed to be the ones that led investors and traders to act last week. Continue reading

The Dollar Jumped and Stocks Rallied Last Week … What were The Triggers?

Concerns about the Ukraine and Islamic State remained high last week, but diminished at week-end on news of a cease-fire in Ukraine and NATO resolve to address the Islamic State. The European Central Bank (ECB) surprised markets (bullishly), and U.S. economic news was biased to the positive.

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Japanese Economic Update: A Meaningful Recovery?

Monica Defend, Pioneer’s Head of Global Asset Allocation Research, and Alessia Berardi, Japanese Global Asset Allocation Research Economist recently released an update on the Japanese economy. Below are some of the highlights. For the full report, click here. Continue reading

Summer Ends Quietly…with a Market-Moving Speech

Last week in the capital markets: A Quiet Last Week of August.  Economic news again suggested the U.S. economy is fine, while Asia and Europe are facing headwinds.  Mario Draghi’s dovish-sounding speech at Jackson Hole a week ago was probably more market-moving than anything that happened last week. Continue reading

UK Forecast Update: Growth, Inflation and Monetary Policy

Pioneer’s Head of Global Asset Allocation Research, Monica Defend, along with Europe and EMEA Global Asset Allocation Research Senior Economist, Andrea Brasili, recently released an update on the UK economy. The update was based on the 2Q14 preliminary results for gross domestic product (GDP), which came in higher than expected. They expect growth above 3%, higher inflation in 2015, and a gradual shift in monetary policy towards higher rates. Highlights from their report are below. To read the full report, click here. Continue reading

Geopolitics Trumped Economics in Last Week’s Capital Markets

Observations on the Capital Markets – Week Ended August 8, 2014

Ukraine developments, more than economic news, seemed to drive the day-to-day pattern of market returns.  Russia first massed troops on the border, prompting NATO to warn of imminent invasion risks, then sent them back to their barracks, keying Friday’s rally.  The conflict is far from over.

Developments in Gaza (a brief cease-fire) and Iraq—where Obama (reluctantly, it seems) authorized airstrikes against ISIS, leaving both domestic hawks and doves feeling unsatisfied—also made the front page, while central banks in Europe, England, Japan, Australia, and India all left policy essentially unchanged—not front page news.  The global composite Purchasing Managers Index (PMI) made a new 9-year high in July at 55.5 ‑ but with war risks high, no one paid much attention.         Continue reading

The FOMC Holds Steady as Markets Hit a “Tipping Point”

 

Observations on the Capital Markets – Week Ended August 1, 2014

The FOMC met last week, expressed satisfaction and maintained course. While their policy decisions (continue the taper—now $25b—and keep the Fed Funds rate where it is) were no surprise, the language of the Fed statement was tweaked to reflect the continued/continuing improvement in the economy and labor markets (e.g.: “the likelihood of inflation running persistently below 2% has diminished somewhat”).  The Fed feels it is accomplishing its goal…so a continuation of policy normalization is appropriate.

At the same time, the Fed statement said “…a range of labor market indicators suggests that there remains significant underutilization of labor resources.” Analysis: the Yellen Fed is moving cautiously…with Japan and Europe still weak, the Fed appears willing to risk an inflationary boom in the U.S. to minimize the likelihood of having to fight a recession and/or deflation when it has a bloated balance sheet and low Fed Funds rate, but very robust tools to fight inflation.  As I said on CNBC last week, a submarine commander doesn’t give the order to submerge when most of the hatches are closed.

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